Incserv No Comments

Delaware Annual Report & Franchise Tax – Help! Part One

Last week when we discussed Annual Report Services (click here to read that blog), we mentioned most jurisdictions have annual filing Delaware Annual Report & Franchise Taxand/or tax requirements. Delaware is one of those jurisdictions that requires annual report filings and franchise tax payments. Depending on the entity type, both may be required or just one…but, we’ll get into those details later.  Since Delaware also happens to be the jurisdiction we seem to get the most questions about, we decided to tackle the subject in a series of blogs. Today we’ll start by answering just a few basic questions…

What is a Delaware Annual Report? This is a document filed annually with the State of Delaware Division of Corporations detailing pertinent company details. Information such as the Principal Place of Business, Officer and Director details, and stock information are included on the annual report. The stock information provided helps to determine the annual franchise tax due. Not all entities are required to file an annual report.

What is franchise tax? Franchise taxes are an annual fee paid to the State of Delaware Division of Corporations for your entity. For corporations, the franchise tax fee is based on authorized shares. For alternative entities, such as LLCs, the fee is a flat rate. Most entities are required to pay a franchise tax.

What entity types file an annual report and/or pay franchise taxes? When are they due?

Entity Type Annual Report Franchise Tax Due Date
Domestic Corporations Yes Yes March 1st
Exempt Domestic Corporations Yes No March 1st
Domestic Limited Liability Companies No Yes June 1st
Domestic Limited Partnerships No Yes June 1st
Foreign Corporations Yes Yes June 30th
Foreign Limited Liability Companies No Yes June 1st
Foreign Limited Partnerships No Yes June 1st
Delaware Statutory Trusts No No N/A
As mentioned above, these are just the basics. Over the next few weeks, we will continue to discuss Delaware annual reports and franchise taxes in more detail. Be sure to check back weekly or subscribe to the blog so you don’t miss out! Of course, if you have a question in the meantime, feel free to reach out to us. We’d be happy to help you out!

Incserv No Comments

Independent Manager – Why?

In our blog “What is an Independent Manager?” we briefly touched on why an LLC would appoint an Independent Manager.independent manager - why? Before we dig a little deeper into the why of Independent Representation – did you know there are other names this special role goes by, dependent upon the type of entity? Independent Director, Springing Member, and Special Member are some of the other terms you will hear when referring to this special type of representation within a company’s board. An Independent Director and a Springing Member are both types of Special Members. A Springing Member is a member that sits dormant until an event triggers the need to bring the Member into action. This could then cause them to be an Independent Manager. For the sake of this blog, we’ll stick to discussing an Independent Manager on an LLC’s board of managers.

So, why appoint someone to this special role? There are various reasons for appointing this position, but a common motive for appointment is to protect the lender.    As an independent party with no financial relationship with the LLC, an Independent Manager simply fulfills their obligation as indicated in the operating agreement. This section of the operating agreement is drafted with consent by the lending party, so this independent party acts as a representative for the financial institution.

As long as there is a debt held by the lender or financial institution, the Independent Manager would remain active and required to vote in the interest of the lender or financial institution, including voting against bankruptcy, thus safeguarding the lender.

While the situations and names may vary, the role is rather consistent. If you have any questions about or need to appoint Independent Representation, just give us a call or email us.

 

Incserv No Comments

What is an Independent Manager?

This week’s informational blog covers the basics of what Independent Representation is byIndependent Manager answering the question – What is an Independent Manager?

A Limited Liability Company (LLC) is managed by a board of managers.  The board of managers oversees the activities of  an LLC.  An Independent Manager is a special type of manager appointed to the LLC’s board that has no equity relationship with the entity and thus is considered to be independent of the LLC’s ownership.  The role of this unique position is usually outlined in the LLC’s operating agreement.

So…Why would an LLC appoint an Independent Manager? Appointment of Independent Representation may be a lender or third party requirement in a transaction. This special position provides a level of security for the third party. (Think of it as insurance.) As we previously mentioned, the third party will detail the Independent Manager’s duties when drafting the operating agreement. These duties generally require the Independent Manager be a party to and vote in certain major board decisions. Again, the specific types of decisions the Independent Manager must give consent for are also outlined in the operating agreement of the LLC.  By requiring this unique position, the third party retains some control over the LLC without actively managing the entity.

These are just the basics. If you want to learn more, have questions about, or need to appoint Independent Representation, feel free to reach out to us. We would be happy to assist you. And don’t forget to keep an eye on our blog for more info to come…

 

Incserv No Comments

What is a Registered Agent and Why Are They Important?

A registered agent is the company or person you designate to receive legal and tax notices for your company. Most jurisdictions legally require entitiesWhat is a registered agent and why are they important? such as corporations and limited liability companies (LLCs) to list a company or individual physically located within the jurisdiction and available normal business hours to serve as this point of contact. Resident agent, statutory agent, and statutory representation are some of the additional titles a registered agent may go by.

So, why is a registered agent important? Well, aside from the legal requirement telling you that you have to have one (which in my book makes them kind of important), a registered agent helps you sustain your business by providing important documents and notices to keep you compliant in the jurisdictions you formed or qualified to do business in. Since these documents and notices usually require an action within a limited amount of time, it’s imperative your agent always has up-to-date contact information for you.

As mentioned earlier, the registered agent will receive and forward important legal and governmental documents and notices. In the case of legal documents such as Service of Process (SOP), you may have only a few days to respond to a summons. If your agent doesn’t have your current contact information, important response dates could be missed, resulting in significant legal repercussions. The same holds true for annual report and franchise tax notices. Invalid contact information may equate to a missed filing date and major headache, with late fees, penalties, and interest continually accruing.

Not only is keeping your registered agent up-to-date with current contact information for your entity important, but so is ensuring your annual registered agent fees are paid. Failure to maintain a registered agent may result in your agent resigning. When an agent resigns, the company is no longer considered to be in good standing with the jurisdiction and you risk losing the legal protections your entity may provide you. Returning to good standing with the jurisdiction then usually requires additional fees and may even involve filing new documents. So, why risk it?

If you have any questions or need assistance with Registered Agent Services, feel free to reach out to us. We’re always happy to help!

Incserv No Comments

Certificate of Incumbency – A Case Study

Over the past few weeks, we’ve covered the ins and outs of boat registrations, as well as the “Who?” “What?””Why?”and “How” forCertificate of Incumbency Case Study a Certificate of Incumbency. Today we wrap it all up with a real-life case study of how a Certificate of Incumbency was able to help an international boat owner.

An international client needed to prove to Israeli authorities he was the rightful owner of his boat. The boat was registered under the name of a Limited Liability Company (LLC). This client in turn owned the LLC. Sounds simple enough, right? Wrong… A basic LLC formation document in Delaware does not list the owners of the entity. So, how does the client prove ownership then? One suggestion his legal counsel gave was to file an Amendment in Delaware adding an article to show he was the owner. However, this would mean the client’s personal information, such as home address would become public information, which was not an ideal solution for this client. In talking with the client about the situation, we mentioned we often provide a Certificate of Incumbency for international clients needing to prove ownership to banking officials.  The client asked for a sample document and conferred with his attorney. The attorney agreed the Certificate of Incumbency would sufficiently meet the needs to prove his ownership. The client provided us with all the necessary documentation. We then drafted the certificate, had it notarized, and sent it to the State of Delaware for an Apostille. The end result? A very happy client!

If you have additional questions or need assistance with obtaining a certificate, give us a call or email us. We’re always happy to help you out in any way we can. Just remember, we can’t give legal or tax advice. You’ll have to contact an attorney or CPA for that.

Gennine No Comments

Illinois Makes Changes to Limited Liability Company Act

Incorporating Services, Ltd. (Incserv) is an active member of the National Public Records Research Association (NPRRA). One of the many benefits of this membership is the continuous flow of information from other members regarding changes in policy, law and processing of public records searching and filing across the US. We received the below information from the NPRRA.

Illinois Secretary of State has issued changes to their Limited Liability Company (LLC) Law.  Effective 7/1/2017.

To read the Administrative Changes of Note issued by the Illinois Secretary of State click here:
Administrative Changes of Note to the LLC Law

To read the HB 4361 in its entirety:
http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/publicacts/99/PDF/099-0637.pdf

If you have questions or need assistance, feel free to contact us or call 800-346-4646.