Amanda No Comments

Delaware Boat Registration Series – Part 2

Delaware boat registrationIn part one of our three part Delaware Boat Registration series we answered some frequently asked questions about how to register your boat in Delaware. Here in part two, we’re covering boat registration renewals, transfers, and deflagging/deleting.

When can I renew my Delaware boat registration? As mentioned in part one, Delaware boat registrations run on a calendar year. Beginning mid-October, registration renewal opens up. Therefore if your registration expires December 31st, you may renew beginning in mid-October.

What information do I need to renew my Delaware boat registration? You will need the information from your original registration, such as the hull number, boat registration/DL number and the exact individual or company name your boat is registered under. Please note if your boat is registered under a company name, the company needs to be in good standing with the State of Delaware and with its registered agent.

I need to renew, but my address needs to be changed. How do I change the address on my registration? Your address can be updated during the renewal or transfer process.

Can I use your address on my registration? Yes. If you’re an Incserv registered agent client, you can use our address on the registration.

How do I transfer my Delaware boat registration? Transferring registration is simple. You’ll need a notarized bill of sale and then you will complete a new application. For all the details on new applications, click here to check out part one of our series.

Can I deflag or delete my Delaware boat registration? Deleting your Delaware Boat registration is also commonly referred to as deflagging your boat. Like transferring registration, the process is easy. All you need is the registration number. This is the number that starts with DL on your registration card. The Delaware Department of Natural Resources (DNREC) can then produce a deletion letter. If the deletion letter needs to be apostilled for use abroad, we can help with that too!

As always, if you have additional questions or need assistance with boat registration, renewal, transfer, and/or deletion, give us a call or email us. We would be happy to help, as we courier boat registrations back and forth to DNREC several times a week for our clients.

Amanda No Comments

Delaware Boat Registration Series – Part 1

delaware boat registration“How does Delaware boat registration work?” or “I need to register my boat in Delaware. Can you help?”  are questions we often hear from clients.  Good news! The Delaware boat registration process is relatively quick and painless. Read on to get all the details broken down in an easy to follow question and answer format.

What documents will I need  for my Delaware boat registration?  All boats / vessels will need a completed Delaware Department of Natural Resources (DNREC) boat registration application.  New boats will also need a copy of the Manufacturer’s Certificate of Origin (MCO) or Builder’s Certificate assigned to purchaser(s) and Bill of Sale if Certificate of Origin or Builder’s Certificate is not assigned to purchaser(s), and a Federal or State Issued ID, such as a driver’s license or passport. For used boats, a copy of the title, registration (non-title states only), federal documentation (photocopy of seller’s most recent Certificate of Documentation), and if applicable, a lien release must accompany the application.  In many cases, a copy of notarized bill of sale with complete description of the vessel is also needed.

How long does the Delaware boat registration process take? Once we have all of your documentation, we can email you proof of registration within about three (3) business days. Originals will then be mailed or sent overnight.

What does the State of Delaware provide as proof of registration for my boat/vessel? DNREC provides a boat registration card and two (2) decals. A verification letter can also be obtained, if needed.

What does the Delaware boat registration card look like? The Delaware boat / vessel registration card is printed on white paper. They no longer provide a blue plastic registration card.

How long is Delaware boat registration good for? Delaware boat / vessel registrations are available in annual or three-year increments. Registration runs on a calendar year and is not prorated. Therefore, the fees will be the same and your registration will expire on December 31st, whether you register your boat/vessel in January or October.

What is the cost for a Delaware boat registration? Fees vary depending on the size of the boat and whether you choose a one (1) year or three (3) year registration term.  For example, in 2017,  a 10’ boat/vessel registered for one (1) year, is $20, but a 49’ boat / vessel registered for three (3) years is $300.

If you have additional questions or need assistance with Delaware boat registration, give us a call or email us. We would be happy to help, as we courier boat registrations back and forth to DNREC several times a week for our clients.

Gennine No Comments

Delaware House Bill 175 Passed

Delaware House Bill 175, passed on July 2nd, alters various fees assessed by the Delaware Secretary of State.  The Bill Synopsis is as follows:

“This Act alters various fees assessed by the Delaware Secretary of State. The Act provides that most changes to the fees and taxes assessed will take effect on August 1, 2017; however increases to the maximum franchise tax and the late penalty for the filing of an annual franchise tax report shall take effect for the tax year beginning January 1, 2017, and the increase of the assumed par value multiplier for calculation of the corporate franchise tax and the authorized shares multiplier for corporations with greater than 10,000 authorized shares for calculation of the corporate franchise tax shall take effect for the tax year beginning on January 1, 2018.”

Click here to read Delaware House Bill 175 in detail.

If you have any questions or need assistance with annual reports or franchise taxes, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Gennine No Comments

DE Secretary of State Employee Recognition Luncheon

Update*

Reminder…

On Friday, June 9, 2017 an Employee Recognition Luncheon is planned for all the employees of the Delaware Secretary of State – Division of Corporations.  State services have been altered.

* There will be NO “Same Day” or “Must Approval” service filings for this day.

All 30 Minute and One-Hour service filings must be received prior to 10:00 AM (ET)Two-Hour service filings will need to be received prior to 9:00 AM (ET) and 24 Hour service filings must be received prior to 12:00 PM (ET).

We will be able to secure filing dates and times until 10:30 PM (ET).

To meet these deadlines, Incerv must receive all filings AT LEAST 15 MINUTES before the DE SOS corresponding cut-off times.

Incserv will have full-staff available to meet all of your corporate and UCC needs. Contact us via email or call 800.346.4646
(International callers please dial 302.531.0855.)

Gennine No Comments

March 24th – DE Secretary of State Cut-Off Times Altered!

On Friday, March 24, 2017 an Employee Recognition Luncheon is planned for all the employees of the Delaware Secretary of State – Division of Corporations.  State services have been altered.

All 30 Minute and One-Hour service filings must be received prior to 6:00 PM (ET) and Two-Hour service filings will need to be received prior to 5:00 PM (ET).  All other cut-off times will remain unchanged.

We will be able to secure filing dates and times until 10:30 PM (ET).

To meet these deadlines, Incserv must receive all filings AT LEAST 15 MINUTES

before the DE Secretary of State corresponding cut-off times.

Incserv will have full-staff available to meet all of your corporate and UCC needs. Contact us via email or call 800.346.4646 (International callers please dial 302.531.0855).

Gennine No Comments

Succeeding at Biz: 4 Easy Rules That Will Keep Your Delaware Corporation Alive.

Incorporating Services, Ltd. (Incserv) is very fortunate to repost a wonderful article originally published online at Daily-Journal.com, The Kankakee Valley, Illinois. The author is Mr. Cliff Ennico of The Law Offices of Clifford R. Ennico located at 2490 Black Rock Turnpike, # 354 Fairfield, Connecticut 06825.

The article can be read below in its entirety.

Some friends and I started a high-tech business a couple of years ago and formed a Delaware corporation to run the business. We live and work in another state but were told that Delaware was the place to be for tech startups (it might have been one of your columns, actually).

We formed the corporation online to save money, and it seemed like everything was OK.

A couple of weeks ago, we signed a letter of intent with an angel investor who wants to put $3 million into our company. Needless to say, we were very excited.

But when the investor’s lawyer looked into our company, he made some horrifying discoveries. It seems Delaware killed off our corporation two years ago because we didn’t pay a “franchise tax,” whatever that is. Because our corporation was no longer active, somebody else grabbed our name in Delaware and is now trying to register it as a trademark. If that person succeeds in doing that, we will have to hand over our website domain name even though we’ve spent a fortune building a website around it.

The lawyer also told us that because we never registered in the state where we are actually doing business, we owe tons of money in penalties even though we’ve paid taxes here every year. Now the investor is not so excited about doing business with us. While we are embarrassed as hell, shouldn’t someone have told us we had to do this stuff?

While it could be true that I once wrote a column about the benefits of tech startups incorporating in Delaware, let’s be clear: I never, ever advised someone to form a corporation or limited liability company (LLC) online, and this is one of the reasons. While the online services can get you up and running quickly and cheaply, they don’t help you with the things you need to do on an ongoing basis to keep your corporation or LLC alive. This email is a perfect example of what can happen when you don’t stay on top of things compliance wise.

Having wagged my finger at this reader, I have to say I’m sympathetic to her plight. When you are building a fast-growing tech company, you are working 24/7 365 days per year, living on Red Bull, ramen noodles and three hours of sleep per week. Nobody is thinking about legal compliance. Yet failing to keep on top of things can kill your startup, as this reader’s email attests.

Here are four easy rules that will help keep your corporation or LLC on life support.

Rule No. 1: Hire a lawyer and an accountant, and listen to them! It is impossible to run a tech startup in the United States without a good lawyer and a good accountant. You need both, especially if you are too busy to deal with government paperwork. Whenever your lawyer or accountant tells you something needs to be done, do it immediately! They are not just trying to run up a bill. They are trying to save your butt.

Rule No. 2: Watch your mailbox and inbox. I am certain that the state of Delaware or the corporation’s registered agent sent this reader both emails and snail-mail reminders telling her when annual reports, franchise tax reports and other compliance paperwork were due. She probably threw them away thinking they were junk mail or spam.

This point is so important that I need to scream: WHEN YOU HAVE A CORPORATION OR LLC AND YOU GET MAIL FROM A STATE OR GOVERNMENT AGENCY ADDRESSED TO THE COMPANY, IT IS NEVER, EVER TO BE TREATED AS JUNK MAIL! If you are too busy to deal with it, you should forward the email, or scan and email the paper correspondence to your lawyer and accountant IMMEDIATELY. Let them tell you whether it’s important or not. If they say it’s important, follow Rule No. 1.

Rule No. 3: Pay your registered agent. If you are incorporated in Delaware or a state other than where you are actually located, your online service hired a registered agent in that state to act as your local presence. That company will send you a bill each year for its services. Pay it promptly. If it doesn’t get paid, it will withdraw as your registered agent, and the state will dissolve your corporation or LLC.

Rule No. 4: Register in your home state. Forming a Delaware corporation does not allow you to operate legally in your home state. For that, you need to register as a foreign corporation with your state’s secretary of state and pay taxes to the state tax authority. You have to do both. Failing to register with the secretary of state can lead to heavy penalties and bar you from your state courts if you ever have to sue someone.

Yes, doing these things costs money. But it’s money well-spent. Find the money, and get them done.

Cliff Ennico (crennico@gmail.com) is a syndicated columnist, author and former host of the PBS television series “Money Hunt.” This column is no substitute for legal, tax or financial advice, which can be furnished only by a qualified professional licensed in your state.

Special thanks to Mr. Ennico for his insight on properly forming and maintaining your corporate entity. Incserv is here to help, contact us for more information.

 

Cullan No Comments

Phone Service Disruption 10.04.16

Having trouble reaching us by phone today? Our phone service provider is experiencing a large phonenetwork outage that in turn is affecting phone service in our Delaware, Washington, DC and Florida offices. Unfortunately this situation is beyond our control and we apologize for any inconvenience. At this time, service is intermittent. If you have trouble reaching us via phone, please feel free to reach out to us via Chat or Email. We’re here!

Please check back for additional updates.

Cullan No Comments

Delaware Fun Facts

Incorporating Services, Ltd (Incserv) has been a Delaware company for over 40 years. We are very proud to be based in Delaware and when the Delaware Business Times posted an article “60 facts about Delaware and its businesses”, we thought we’d share this amusing and quirky list of Delaware fun facts.

http://www.delawarebusinesstimes.com/60-facts-about-delaware-and-its-businesses/

Happy reading and Happy Friday,

The Marketing Team at Incserv

Cullan No Comments

Delaware Statutory Trust

Joshua M. Twilley, President of Incorporating Services, Ltd. shares with us his insight on the Delaware Statutory Trusts.

Delaware is long known to be a leader in corporate law, but Delaware is also a trailblazer in trust law.  In 1988, Delaware was the first state to adopt a legal framework governing trust law, with the passage of the Delaware Business Trust Act, which governs the Delaware Statutory Trust (DST).  While other states have adopted similar legislation, the Delaware version has evolved over the years.  Today, the DST is considered the preferred vehicle for trust activities that involve financial transactions.

What is a Delaware Statutory Trust?

In an ordinary trust relationship, a fiduciary would hold legal title on a property on behalf of another, who held the equity title.  These trusts are governed by a Common Law framework.  The Delaware Business Trust Law allows for the creation of a Delaware Statutory Trust (DST).  The DST is considered a separate entity which can in many ways behave like a corporate entity, with a body of trustees and a group of beneficial owners.

What makes a Delaware Statutory Trust a preferred vehicle?

This structure offers a number of advantages.  The trust can have multiple trustees and beneficial owners, who receive the same liability protection afforded to stockholders of a Delaware corporation.  As an independent entity, the DST can enter into contracts while still protecting beneficial owners, and even provides beneficial owners protection in the event of bankruptcy.  Finally, the Delaware Court of Chancery, widely considered one of the best corporate and trust courts in the world, has jurisdiction over the DST.

How is a Delaware Statutory Trust formed and maintained?

Forming a DST is an easy process, requiring a certificate of trust to be filed with the Delaware Secretary of State, along with the Trust Agreement.  There are no annual maintenance requirements (franchise tax or annual report) for a DST.  A Delaware resident must be named as a trustee.

Incserv can assist in all aspects of filing the Delaware Statutory Trust and can provide a Delaware resident as a trustee.  Contact us for more information.

The information within this post is intended for general information purposes only. Incserv and its employees cannot offer legal or financial advice. Please consult with your legal counsel for assistance in how this information may or may not affect you and your business prior to making any decisions. The above information (and any attachments) should be judged accordingly.

Cullan No Comments

The Panama Papers Part II

Joshua M. Twilley, President of Incorporating Services, Ltd. shares with us the following with regards to the Panama Papers.

The Panama Papers (Papers) put a spotlight on the uses of corporate entities for tax purposes.  While many (if not most) of the entities in the Papers were established legally and are not necessarily involved in legal wrongdoing, the focus on the uses of corporate entities and how they can be monitored while protecting the privacy of entities is an important discussion.  I previously wrote about the Panama Papers here.

Rick Geisenberger, Chief Deputy Secretary of State of Delaware and head of the Department of Corporations, recently outlined some of the issues facing identification and prosecution of those using corporate entities operating in illegal ways.  Mr. Geisenberger’s article appears in the September/October 2016 issue of Delaware Business, a publication of the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce.

This insightful article, which can be found here, also highlights several easy-to-implement solutions to make sure corporate entities are not used for illegal purposes.

Delaware has been a leader on developing best practices for protecting America’s interests, which many other states have adopted.  I agree with Rick that the solution can’t be solved by looking to each state to adopt some form of compliance, with 50 different sets of laws and 50 different levels of corporate involvement.  The currently proposed federal solution outlined in the article would ensure compliance in all jurisdictions, creating a good balance of protection and privacy, and give federal authorities the ability to investigate and prosecute.

The information within this post is intended for general information purposes only. Incserv and its employees cannot offer legal or financial advice. Please consult with your legal counsel for assistance in how this information may or may not affect you and your business prior to making any decisions. The above information (and any attachments) should be judged accordingly.